AlvoGenius 100 mg

Omega 3 for children

Optimal source of DHA that promotes healthy brain and sight development.2

Fast-growing brains need the right building material. AlvoGenius for children provides 100 mg of DHA per day which promotes a healthy brain and nervous system.2

By taking DHA regularly your child's brain and eyes receive the proper raw material for healthy growth. This helps in the long-run and studies have shown that DHA intake in children can have a positive effect on cognitive, mental and visual factors.  

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