Sight development

Eye development and fatty acids

DHA is important for development of the nervous system and serves an important role in pre- and postnatal eye development in babies.2

Besides playing an important structural role, DHA has been found to positively affect gene expression, such as the synthesis of proteins important for eyesight.

Since DHA is a building block of the retina it is important for maintaining healthy vision throughout life. Newborns who have low levels of Omega 3 have been shown to have less sensitivity towards light than those who do not suffer from Omega 3 deficiency.20

It is therefore very wise for pregnant women to take an Omega 3 supplement with high DHA concentrations to help maximize their children's eye health.10

 

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